How to M1: Six Variations of Make One

The make one is a commonly used knitting increase, but there are 6 variations of this stitch: m1, m1l, m1r, m1p, m1pl, m1pr. Each one looks a little bit different in your work. 

First, let’s define the abbreviations (note that the fist 3 make ones are done knitwise and last 3 are the same, but they’re done purlwise):

  • M1 – make one
  • M1l – make one left
  • M1r – make one right
  • M1p – make one purlwise
  • M1pl – make one left purlwise
  • M1pr – make one right purlwise

Each of the 3 variations differ by the way they lean: 

  • M1 and m1p do not lean and they leave a small hole in your work
  • M1l and m1lp lean toward the left
  • M1r and m1rp lean toward the right

M1 Video Tutorial

In this video, I demonstrate how to do all 6 variations. Then below the video are photos to show how they appear in your work.

Practice Reading Your Knitting

In the photo below, I’ve highlighted the columns of stitches that flank the m1’s in green. These columns run from the bottom of the photo to the top. I’ve also highlighted the newly formed columns of stitches (as a result of doing the make ones) in blue.

You’ll notice 6 dots on the photo. Those are the make ones. The bottom 3, from left to right are: m1l, m1, m1r. The top 3 from left to right are: m1pr, m1p, m1pl. The purlwise increases were done on the purl side, but they are shown here on the knit side because they are barely noticeable on the purl side.

Note that the following stitches match perfectly when the knitwise m1’s are done on the knit side and the purlwise m1’s are done on the purl side:

  • M1l and m1rp (at the left of the photo)
  • M1 and m1p (in the center of the photo)
  • M1r and m1lp (at the right of the photo)

Here is the same photo without the markups. Can you identify the make ones?

M1 Written Instructions

How to M1

Work a m1 just like a regular knit stitch, but instead of inserting your working needle into the stitch on the left needle, you will:

  1. Insert your working needle from the front to the back under the strand between the needles
  2. Draw up a loop to knit (just like a regular knit stitch)

How to M1p

Work a m1p just like a regular purl stitch, but instead of inserting your working needle into the stitch on the left needle, you will:

  1. Insert your working needle from the back to the front under the strand between the needles
  2. Draw up a loop to purl (just like a regular purl stitch)

How to M1l

  1. Insert your left needle from the front to the back into the strand between your needles
  2. Knit into the back of that stitch

How to M1pl

  1. Insert your left needle from the front to the back into the strand between your needles
  2. Purl into the back of that stitch

How to M1r

  1. Insert your left needle from the back to the front into the strand between your needles
  2. Knit into the front of that stitch

How to M1pr

  1. Insert your left needle from the back to the front into the strand between your needles
  2. Purl into the front of that stitch

Want to Try it in a Project?

Several of these make ones are used in the Keavy Pullover pattern, one of the projects in the Knit Along Club, where we will guide you through every step of the pattern with written, photo, and video tutorials similar to this one.

If you are the kind of knitter who wants to finish projects faster with fewer mistakes, then join me in the Knit Along Club and take your knitting to the next level!

2 thoughts on “How to M1: Six Variations of Make One”

  1. Michelle Jephcott

    I knit English-style (I’m a thrower, not a picker!), so I find I have to slow down instructional videos of those who knit Continental (pickers, not throwers). I slowed yours down *too* much, Beth, to 25% and then got the giggles because you sound absolutely hammered drunk. (50% is slow enough, FWIW.)

    At any rate, these instructions are wonderfully informative and have helped me come to realize that my M1’s look so weird because I actually combine M1, M1R and M1L into one weird-looking stitch… I don’t think I do it the same way twice, though. 🙂

    1. Lol!!! I wonder what it would have sounded like if I really was hammered drunk and you slowed it down. I’m glad it was helpful!

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